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Stafford, New York

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World Handicap System — launch error — fix forthcoming

Posted on Jan 6, 2020 |

From the technical team that is launching the World Handicap System: “In our final preparations to launch WHS and centralized computation in the U.S., we have identified a technical issue affecting some golfers related to look-up features in the system.  We are working directly with our hosting providers and believe this issue will be resolved shortly.  We appreciate your patience and your help in bringing this to our...

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World Handicap System: A Collaborative Process

Posted on Jan 6, 2020 |

The vision to unify the six different handicap systems in use around the world into a single World Handicap System required the commitment of, and collaboration between, many organizations. All of the following organizations have given their support to this important initiative and played their part in establishing the key principles, which shaped the proposals and drove forward the initiative to the point where a new World Handicap System can be introduced to the golfing world in 2020: Argentine Golf Association (AAG) Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU) European Golf Association (EGA) Golf Australia (GA) South African Golf Association (SAGA) United States Golf Association (USGA) The R&A Together, they have been instrumental in developing a consistent method for golfers to measure their ability and track their progress.  The proposed new system will enable all golfers to compete or play socially on level terms with anyone, regardless of where they are from in the world, thereby providing greater enjoyment of the sport. The journey began with a meeting between The R&A, the USGA and the other handicap authorities to find out whether there was any interest in pursuing a World Handicap System, incorporating a single set of Rules of Handicapping and a single Course Rating System.  It was soon discovered that the core principles of each of the existing systems were very similar, which is to measure a golfer’s potential ability so that players of differing abilities can compete on reasonably equal terms. Further, the USGA’s Course Rating and Slope Systems are already used extensively around the world which would further ensure consistency for how course difficulty is evaluated within a World Handicap System.  This discovery prompted a positive reaction, and a series of meetings followed to advance the work, which included establishing foundational principles accepted by all golfing cultures. Beginning in 2015, presentations and briefings were made around the world and the feedback was overwhelmingly positive and supportive. It was decided to establish a formal Committee structure with representation from 15 different National Associations from around the world, including the six existing handicap authorities, the Japan Golf Association and Golf Canada.  Other National Associations and bodies were included in...

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World Handicap System is now “live”

Posted on Jan 6, 2020 |

World Handicap System Home    FAQs The way golfers around the world will calculate their handicaps is set to be transformed by a new system developed by the USGA and The R&A, with key features designed to provide all golfers with a consistent measure of playing ability. The new World Handicap System, to be implemented in 2020, follows an extensive review of systems administered by six existing handicapping authorities: Golf Australia, the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU) in Great Britain and Ireland, the European Golf Association (EGA), the South African Golf Association (SAGA), the Argentine Golf Association (AAG) and the USGA. The new system will feature the following: • Flexibility in formats of play, allowing both competitive and recreational rounds to count for handicap purposes and ensuring that a golfer’s handicap is more reflective of potential ability • A minimal number of scores needed to obtain a new handicap; a recommendation that the number of scores needed to obtain a new handicap be 54 holes from any combination of 18-hole and 9-hole rounds, but with some discretion available for national or regional associations to set a different minimum within their own jurisdiction • A consistent handicap that is portable from course to course and country to country through worldwide use of the USGA Course and Slope Rating System, already successfully used in more than 80 countries • An average-based calculation of a handicap, taken from the best eight out of the last 20 scores and factoring in memory of demonstrated ability for better responsiveness and control • A calculation that considers the impact that abnormal course and weather conditions might have on a player’s performance each day • Daily handicap revisions, taking account of the course and weather conditions calculation • A limit of Net Double Bogey on the maximum hole score (for handicapping purposes only).  Example: A Course Handicap of 18 receives one stroke per hole for 18 holes; the player’s max score is triple bogey on any hole, which equals a Net Double Bogey. • A maximum handicap limit of 54.0, regardless of gender, to encourage more golfers to measure and track their performance to increase their...

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More news on the new World Handicap System

Posted on Dec 23, 2019 |

World Handicap System Launches!   On January 1, 2020, the World Handicap System will officially launch in the United States, delivering the first universal Rules of Handicapping for all golfers. For the first time in the U.S., every Handicap Index will now be computed through a centralized database to ensure consistency and integrity in every number. In anticipation of this significant change, golfers in the U.S. will NOT be able to post scores or access their Handicap Index between January 1-5, 2020 as we migrate to the new technology. Starting on January 6, golfers will be able to post any scores they missed during this temporary down time, and any rounds played between January 1 - 5 will be used for handicapping purposes under the new World Handicap System. RDGA Educating Member Clubs on WHS There have been 5 educational RDGA WHS Seminars held over the months of October- December. We have over 60 RDGA Clubs who have attended a 4 Hour Seminar and have passed a quiz fulfilling their Club Compliance to be able to utilize the World Handicap System in 2020. This means that the WHS representatives from those Clubs that have been authorized and are currently working on a number of items to provide a seamless transition (for the golfer) to the World Handicap System and the new GHIN products. Each RDGA Member Club is working on individualized rosters for their clubs. Searching for missing email addresses, junior birth dates, disconnecting duplicates emails assigned to 2 or more individuals and merging golfing records of members who are assigned 2 or more GHIN numbers are some of the tasks your club representatives are working on. If your club reaches out to you seeking this information, please reply promptly as they are proactively collecting necessary information for this transition. 5 Things to Know About the WHS : The Handicap Index Calculation is changing You will have a new Playing Handicap Net Double Bogey will replace ESC You will have a more responsive Handicap Index updates Safeguards have been added to protect your handicap Index   Where to Find Additional Information RDGA.org Revision emails (after each posted round) Monthly RDGA...

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World Handicap System goes live on 6-Jan

Posted on Dec 1, 2019 |

The 5 Things You Need to Know About the New World Handicap System (WHS) Beginning in 2020 a brand-new set of Rules for Handicapping will be introduced globally: Your Handicap Index may change. But that’s ok! Finally, players around the world will have an apples-to-apples handicap. Your new Handicap Index will be more responsive to good scores by averaging your eight best scores out of your most recent 20 (currently, it’s 10 out of 20 with a .96 multiplier). In short, your Handicap Inde will be determined by your demonstrated ability and consistency of scores. In most cases for golfers in the U.S., it will change less than one stroke. You need to know your Course Handicap.  In the new system, your Course Handicap will be the number of strokes needed to play to par. This will result in greater variance in that number and presents a change, as historically it has represented the number of strokes needed to play to the Course Rating. This is a good thing, as par is an easy number to remember. Target score for the day? Par plus Course Handicap. The Course Rating will now be inherent within the calculation to be more intuitive and account for competing from different tees. Net Double Bogey.   The maximum hole score for each player will be limited to a Net Double Bogey. This adjustment is more consistent from hole to hole than the Equitable Stroke Control procedure. Net Double Bogey is already used in many other parts of the world and the calculation is simple: Par + 2 + any handicap strokes you receive. Your Handicap Index will be revised daily. One way that handicapping is being modernized is a player’s Handicap Index will update daily (which will provide a fairer indication of a player’s ability in the moment), if the player submitted a score the day before. On days where the player does not submit a score, no update will take place. Safeguards in the new system.  The new system will limit extreme upward movement of a Handicap Index, automatically and immediately reduce a Handicap Index when an exceptional score of at least 7 strokes...

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Club Officers for the 2020 Season

Posted on Oct 18, 2019 |

Per yesterday's General Membership Meeting, and last week's Women's Association closing dinner/meeting, our Club Officers for the 2020 season are: President:  Dave Dewar Vice President:  Mike McCarthy Secretary & Treasurer:  Lyle Starkweather Women's Association: President: Laura Landers VP:  Karen Heaney Secretary: Dione Harrington Treasurer: Judy Babbitt Thanks to all of our Officers for volunteering to lead our club into a bright...

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